Category Archives: Roofing Materials

Do roofers work in the rain?

For the more beady eyed of you out there, you may have noticed in our latest job ad that as roofers, we are unable to work some days thanks to ‘weather limitations’, more specifically, pouring rain. So with such a drizzly country in the winter, you may be pondering what roofers actually do when it rains, and for those of you who aren’t thinking this, we’re going to tell you anyway.

Weather watchersalt="slates on construction site on rain day"

For years Carol has been my favourite woman to wake up to in the mornings and for those of you who aren’t familiar, I am of course referring to the wonderful weather woman, Carol. Carol graces our screens every morning with an update on what’s going on with the weather, making up one of the most important parts of the day, do I go to work or do I spend an extra hour in bed?

Some jobs, such as slating, are fine to do in the rain and just result in having to wring out our clothes when we get home, however, others not so much.

Why rain matters for projects

There are numerous reasons as to why rain can impact a roofing project, not only that we get soggy feet. Unexpected rain can be a nuisance but if it stops as quickly as it starts, it’s likely that we’re able to cover the project in a tarpaulin for the duration and resume work again once things have cleared up. 

The main reason behind this momentary pause can be put down to a matter of health and safety, however there are a number of other reasons why it can be ineffective to work in thealt="chimney wet slates" rain. When stripping off an old roof (which is necessary when carrying out reroof works) it’s important that you have dry weather as if you open a roof up to the elements and then you have a heavy down pour, there is nothing stopping the rain from going straight into your building, ruining plasterboard and even collapsing ceilings! It’s this reason that you won’t find us stripping a roof in the rain. Also, its difficult to felt a roof in the rain… there’s the obvious health and safely problems and then theres the problem of getting a wet chalk line, among other nuisances. 

Didn’t your mother ever tell you that you’ll get a cold if you play in the rain? Well this is the final reason as to why we are *forced* to take a day off when its wet. On a really wet day its impossible to stay dry, even with the best waterproofs (believe me i’ve tried them all) and come the end of the day, you’re really wet through and this often doesn’t happen without repercussions… 

When fibreglassing, it’s important to remember to work with the weather and not against it, meaning that fibreglassing in the rain is a big no. Heavy rain can emulsify resin, causing it to become white in colour, rendering it utterly useless if a smooth and sleek roof is what you’re aiming for.

Free Quotes and Consultations

So onto the important stuff, if we can’t work, what exactly do we get up to? Well, with busy days and a small team, it can often be difficult to fit in a time to go visit other jobs, meaning that this task is often saved for the weekend. Rainy days give us the chance to get one step ahead during the week as most mornings are spent visiting customers and assessing their roofs to give free consultations and quotes.

Coffee Time

alt="coffee latte art rain day"With little time to chill out during the day, rainy days mean that I can take the office work to a coffee shop to sit back and people watch, sorry, work. This is usually followed by a stop off at my favourite breakfast place, The Buttery Tea Rooms, however, if you are a regular to this page I probably don’t even have to mention that for you to know its on the agenda.

Catch flights not colds

During the month of December, the weather is often too harsh to get on with much work, rendering what we do as inefficient as large gaps between work often mean that the exposed roof can become water damaged in-between. Making up for the overtime worked in the hot summer months, this is a perfect opportunity to pack a bag and head off on a plane somewhere for a month, last year was Korea, this year is China, where next?

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The Best Material For Your Roof

What should you choose?

Choosing the right materials to use on your roof can often seem like a never ending battle as each material has its own pros and cons. Take a look at our simple guide to the pros and cons of each different material to help decide what fits with your goal and budget for your next project.

Slates

As one of the oldest and most traditional materials out there, it seems appropriate to start with the variety of types of slate that you could choose for your home. Offering a natural and low maintenance finish, slates are one of the most durable materials you could choose for you home. What’s more, if you’re looking for a classy, stylish finish with little effort, slate rarely looks out of place. With a range of different types out there, it can be difficult to choose between them and the final decision often comes down to the size of your budget.

Natural Slate

These tiles consist of natural stone taken from quarries across the country and each quarry produces a different colour or shape of slate, making yours entirely unique. These slates often contain small Natural slate roof with gro box gutterimperfections on them, adding character to your home and giving it a look that can’t be replicated. Your natural slate roof will last you a lifetime thanks to its durability, meaning that although the slightly heftier price tag, it can in some cases be worth it.

Artificial slates

These slates are made out of fibre cement, a strong product that can create good quality slates with a smaller price tag. Available in a range of different colours and shades, these slates are often more appropriate for more adventurous architectural projects as they can be applied in a range of different ways.

Although perhaps a more stylish finish, slates can often be more time-consuming to install than other materials, meaning that your overall costs may end up being higher. Additionally, slates are noticeably heavy and cannot be used on lighter roof structures, however they are perhaps more strom-proof than tiled alternatives.

Slates vs Tiles

Clay tiles

Clay tiles are a hugely popular material for many renovations thanks to the wide variety in colours and sizes available. These tiles are quick and easy to install and replace, meaning that if you have a smaller budget, this is the ideal material for you. Although not as long as natural slates, the lifespan of clay tiles can vary between 30 and 70 years, acting as a pretty safe alternative.

Concrete tiles

More budget tiles are made from concrete and are readily available from builders’ merchants across the country, whereas clay tiles are often homemade, rendering them slightly pricier.

Tiles do tend to crack over time, meaning that regular maintenance is key, additionally if you are switching from a different roofing material to tiles, you roof’s support system may need updating thanks to their heavier weight. If you’re desperate for a slate roof but your budget wont quite stretch to it, get the best of both worlds by using roof tiles that look like slates.

Metal roofing

One of the fastest growing materials on the market, metal roofing is a great option if you’re looking for individual shingles made from aluminium, steel or copper, This is appealing thanks to its durability and since is nothing to crack or slip out of place, regular maintenance isn’t necessary, however it does often need to be custom made.

Flat roofs

As specialist flat roofers, this is our area. Flat roofing systems are different to pitched roofs, meaning that slates and tiles aren’t needed to keep your home watertight. Instead, a waterproof membrane is needed to be installed. There are a number of different roofing systems to choose from here so lets go through them…

Felt

Roofing felt is an older, more traditional roofing system that is generally a lot cheaper than its alternatives. With a three layer membrane in most newer felts, modern felt roofing is more sustainable than its former bitumen and stone chip versions, and what’s more, the waterproof polyester membrane ensures that your roof is well protected from the elements whilst providing a substantial level of roof insulation.

Perhaps the cheapest and easiest material to put down, felt is a reliable material that can last around 10 years and after this it is super easy to replace. These membranes are pretty much impenetrable and are great at waterproofing your home on a budget.

GRP Fibreglass

This is one of our favourite materials to work with and lets tell you why. GRP is far more durable and longer lasting than felt materials and only costs a fraction more. It is easy to apply and can be suited to almost any roof types and sizes so long as there are strong enough foundations.

So which is better? Well this comes down to the scale and type of your job. You see, small outbuildings, sheds and garages will fear well with a cheaper felt roof over the top of them, however for larger projects you should probably consider fibreglass. Both systems are similar in terms of how weather tight they are however thanks to its slightly stronger characteristics, fibreglass may be a better alternative in areas with more extreme weather conditions.

Rubber bond

A hugely popular and cost effective material to opt for, rubber roofing is a great choice for property owners with flat roofs. Used as a weather proofing solution in addition to roofing systems, this material is available in black or white and requires little maintenance other than occasional cleaning and repairs (see our last post for more information on the importance of cleaning your rain gutters).

Rubber roofing vs Roofing felt

This is a far more durable material to its felt counterparts and can withstand some of the most extreme weather. It is also more flexible, reducing the difficulty and therefore costs of repairs when leaks occur. Whilst felt still remains the cheapest material, it is worth weighing up all the options before you make your final decision.

Checkout our projects gallery for more information or if you need a little more inspiration 🙂

Can summer damage your roof?

Summer damage for your roof

With the unseasonal August weather leaving us all scratching our heads, you might be pleasantly surprised by the news of a heatwave this weekend. But what does this mean for your roof? With one of the wettest Augusts on record followed by a few days of actual summer weather, this could have a significant impact the longevity of your roof down the road.

You might want to be aware of some of the problems that can crop up so as not to risk a costly total roof replacement, so without further ado, here are some of the ways this summer weather can cause a problem for your roof…

Water is the enemy

With so much rain in a short amount of time followed by a quick flurry of hot weather, these are the perfect conditions for moss and mould growth. When moisture builds up within the layers of your roof, mould and moss is given freedom to grow, damaging your roof from the inside out.

Thriving in warm, wet climates in between shingles in your roof, moss can grow out onto the exteriors of your roof, making it look like you’ve got a thick green blanket over your house. Whilst this may not seem like a big deal, as well as making your roof look rather uneasy on the eye, moss is notorious for holding water. This means that your roof can become covered in concentrated damp patches that will eventually seep through and create leaks.<img alt="water_is_the_enemy">

The problem doesn’t stop there, indeed damp patches in your house can lead to mould which can have a poor impact on your health as well as your interiors.

There are two simple and easy ways to stop the summer storms running your roof. The first option is to stick a strip of zinc across the apex of the roof, creating an alkaline liquid when it comes into contact with water, killing moss as it trickles down. Alternatively, fix a small piece of copper wire underneath your ridge to stop any moss accumulating as well as preventing growth in the first place. If you’re unsure on what to do or simply have too much to deal with on your roof, give us a call and we can sort it.

Summer can escalate rotting damage

Since roof decking is usually made of plywood, leaks from summer storms can leave your decking to bend and rot. Since the decking acts as additional support for your roof thanks to its strength, it cannot support the weight of your roof if damage becomes severe. This means that your roof is in danger of collapsing. Poor attic ventilation accompanied by summer storms and <img alt="rotting">intense heat can also have the same effect as your attic can overheat, accelerating the time taken for mould and rotting to form.

Keep an eye on this, if your ceiling starts to leak that’s a pretty clear sign you have a problem, other more subtle clues include mould and mildew appearing on your walls or dark damp patches in your attic. If you spot a slight sagging or dip in your roofline from the outside then it’s worth taking a look to manage the damage.

It’s recommended that you get your roof inspected at least once a year, so once this weather has passed it’s worth getting someone out to check that all’s good.

Cracked shingles

A little known fact, the sun can cause almost as much damage as rain as with the predicted 30° heat this weekend, your roof can reach almost double this temperature. Intense heat after a cooler, wetter period can lead to your shingles drying out, making them prone to cracking and breaking when the next storm hits. Look out for this as cracking can lead to eventual roof collapse if you’re not careful.

If the confusing August weather has been a little too much for your roof, don’t leave it until it’s too late. We can accommodate to all your roofing needs so give us a shout for a free quote and consultation.

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Common Roofing Questions Answered

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How much will my repair cost?

How much will my roof leak repair cost? How much will it cost for a totally new roof? Questions we hear almost every day, however there is no black and white answer. No matter what the circumstance, it always comes back to how much of your hard earned money it’s going to take to ensure that your roof is in optimal condition and your home is protected from the elements. Everyone’s home is different and prices vary due to location, size of the repair and the materials used. The best way to find out the cost of a repair is to give us a call on 07971 002410 and we will aim to get to you within the week and can offer you a free quote on the day, offering the best quality materials and customer service. It must be noted that without a good quality, well installed roof your building with be susceptible to damp and rot may occur from the top down. Structural joists and beams will be in the line of fire, as well as ceilings and electrics, it really does pay to have a quality roof!

How long can I expect my roof to last?

As to be expected, there are many factors that can prolong or shorten the life of your roof, but in general, a brand new roof can be expected to withstand around 20 years of weathering, with flat roofs naturally lasting less time as water doesn’t run off them as fast. However, a well installed GRP Fibreglass roof installed with top materials can be expected to last upwards of 20 years. There are also elements that affect this lifespan, for instance if you live in an area that experiences weather conditions such as heavy snowfall regularly, your roof may last shorter than is standard. Roofs that are regularly inspected and maintained should last longest and your home will stay protected from the elements for longer.

How long will it take to install a new roof?

When your roof begins to leak, it’s not something you can put off until next year, you need it fixed quickly.Trust us when we say it pays to have a good roof! You may also be unsure of what a repair is needed, whether it’s an easy repair or maybe you’ve reached the end of your current roof’s lifespan and its time for a new roof, rest assured the process is more simple than you may think.

Should a new roof be installed in winter?

There are certainly more advantageous times of year to install a new roof or commission a repair, autumnal and spring showers may cause delays in the work that needs doing as roofers are often unable to work in the rain. Also, GRP Fibreglass needs bone dry conditions with little moisture in the air to allow the resin to cure properly. However, as roofers in England we are experienced at working in harsher climates, meaning that all jobs are feasible in the winter. If its not an urgent repair you need, plan it carefully and book in a job well before the summer to ensure you can be fit in.

Should I install a completely new roof or continue repairing the existing one?

 You may have heard that you can continue replacing tiles or slates on your roof for years instead of installing a new roof, however there are times when a new roof is preferable. Constantly replacing materials won’t always stop your ceiling from leaking and internal damage may occur, meaning that its time to call out the professionals so that they can keep your interiors dry. Additionally, if your tiles or slates continue to slip, they will need refastening or it could be dangerous for those walking directly underneath. This doesn’t necessarily require an entire new roof but it is worth getting an expert out to identify the looser tiles in order to keep your home secure.

What materials should I use?

When considering what materials to use, there are a few elements to consider, for example planning permission and budget. For pitched roofs, the most common materials to use are slate or tiles. Slate can either come in natural form or man made, with the latter usually working out cheaper. When it comes to tiles, the two most common options are clay or concrete with concrete costing considerably less. The more expensive options will usually be more aesthetically pleasing and they are often longer lasting, however they are not always necessary concrete tiles and cement fibre slates will be more than adequate for the vast majority of roofs. They each come in a range of sizes and even colours.

On flat roofs there are a range of options including lead, GRP fibreglass, Rubber and more traditional felt. For more information please see our solutions page, https://www.sacklynroofing.co.uk/roofing-solutions

The team at Sacklyn roofing are experienced and professionally trained workers who will do their best to fix all your roof-related problems in the shortest time possible. We provide a high quality service that ensures that your roof will withstand 20+ years of weathering. For more information visit our main site www.sacklynroofing.co.uk or read our recent blog posts. Alternatively feel free to email us at keith@sacklynroofing.co.uk or call us on 07971 002410.

 

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Slate Roof Hip Alternatives

Mitered Slate Hips

Here’s a few pictures from a 2018 project on an industrial unit roof in Gloucestershire.

The product used was a textured cement fibre slate. A good alternative to natural slate, especially with the textured finish.

Other roofing materials used during this installation were a high quality roofing felt and a treated 25x50mm roofing batten.

The four hips of the roof are joint with a mitered effect in the cement fibre slate, creating an almost seem less join between all four faces of the roof. An alternative method of hip would be to use hip tiles made out of other materials such as clay or concrete.

The ridge was capped with a piece of code 5 lead, thick and durable.

Feel free to contact us with any of your roofing needs!

Code 5 lead cap

Mitered hip

Mitered hip

Mitered hip

Natural Stone Roofs in Gloucestershire

Natural stone roofs are among the oldest roof coverings around and are typically used in the Cotswold’s. A stone roof can last for 100 years or more and look absolutely stunning. Traditionally the roof is tiled with diminishing courses with the largest tiles at the bottom of the roof and the smallest at the top. This is a barn that we are working on at Shipton just outside Cheltenham.

The nature of stripping a stone roof, sorting all the various different size tiles and reusing the sound tiles is always time consuming but the end results are rewarding.

Cheltenham roofing - Retiling the barn roof

Cheltenham Roofers - Re-tiling the Barn Roof

Roofing in Cheltenham - Barn roof.

So if you are looking for experienced roofers in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire or the Cotswold’s then contact us for your free quotation for:

  • Construction of new stone roofs
  • Turning stone roofs
  • Repairing stone roofs

Fibreglass Roofing and a Fishpond

Fibreglass fishpond in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

Fibreglass fishpond in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

K. Sacklyn & Co. are a team of expert roofers working throughout Gloucestershire, so why have we got a photo of a fishpond on our blog?

Glass Reinforced Polyester (GRP) commonly referred to as Fibreglass is a high performance waterproofing system for all types of flat roofing, box gutters, valleys, balconies, walkways or anywhere that requires waterproofing, even fishponds.

It is formed in situ by reinforcing polyester resin with chopped strand matt using a peroxide based catalyst to harden it. Once cured it forms a joint free laminate that will last well in excess of twenty years.  Just the kind of material you want a fishpond to be made from, long lasting and waterproof.

So the photo of the fishpond is one that we fibreglassed in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. The project was completed in 2 days by 2 of our expert roofers.

So if you need a fibreglass roof or even a fishpond give us a call on 01531 828407 or 01242 649694.

Multi-Foil Roof Insulation

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Multi-foil insulation provides thermal efficiency and is only 30mm thick!

Over rafter Multi-Foil insulation can be a great option for your home if you want to insulate your house but have limited roof space and here’s why…

It works both in summer and winter: Actis Triso Super 10. In winter, it retains heat within buildings. In summer, it reflects radiation preventing overheating of attic rooms. Certified as the equivalent of 210mm of mineral wool but is only 30mm!

Other benefits include: seals roof against wind and damp while retaining ventilation; it saves valuable living space; beams and rafters may be left exposed. It is more tricky to install as you have to double batten the roof, however you don’t have to deal with nasty fibreglass mineral wool, or cut celotex insulation between the rafters, which takes an age. Triso is a much faster option.

Above is a new build roof we did in Hartpury, Gloucestershire, that used tin foil type insulation.

Check out our project gallery for more information on our services available, or take a look at our roofing solutions page to see what services we can offer you.